Cinnamon Sugar Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Cinnamon Sugar Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

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I LOVE cinnamon sugar roasted pumpkin seeds! They are very filling, and they make your house smell amazing when they are roasting. And honestly, I think cinnamon sugar is the best seasoning for pumpkin seeds. I also like the idea of reducing how much of the pumpkin goes to waste. Cinnamon sugar roasted pumpkin seeds are a great alternative for those with peanut and tree nut allergies, as they provide similar vitamins and minerals. While this particular recipe makes use of pumpkin seeds (which I got after making some homemade pumpkin puree), the method is the same for all winter squash seeds (e.g., butternut, acorn, delicata, etc.). The only thing that might change, is the roasting time. My favorite seeds to use in this recipe are delicata seeds, which I think have the most flavor. Delicata squash is my absolute favorite, and if you’ve never had it before and are a huge fan of butternut squash, then try out my roasted delicata squash recipe. While this recipe does use granulated sugar, I think it would also taste great with maple syrup or even a little light brown sugar in place of the granulated sugar. You could also experiment with different spice blends, like my homemade pumpkin pie spice or homemade apple pie spice. There are many possibilities, so don’t be afraid to experiment!

How to clean pumpkin seeds?

After scooping them out, I put them in a colander which generally has larger holes than a strainer. Under running water, I then separate the seeds from the pulp as best I can. I don’t aim to get every seed, just the bulk of them. Then I continue to swish the seeds under the running water and removing large pulp chunks as I come across them (see video below for more clarification).

Why are my roasted pumpkin seeds chewy?

This is a common problem and can be due to a few things. It’s possible that the pumpkin seeds were not roasted long enough, too much oil was used, and/or they weren’t allowed to dry thoroughly before seasoning and roasting.

Can you eat pumpkin seeds?

Yes! All winter squash seeds are edible and provide nutrition. You can use them the same way you would use roasted pumpkin seeds.

Are roasted squash seeds good for you?

Yes! Roasted seeds from all varieties of winter squash are good for you! They are also a great alternative for those with peanut and tree nut allergies. The seeds are a great source of protein, fiber, magnesium, iron, and many other vitamins and minerals.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step-by-step instructions in a video format for this recipe are available on my YouTube channel and above the recipe card below.

Step 1. Make sure the oven rack is in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 325F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the seeds and the pulp in a colander with decently sized holes. Under running water, remove the seeds from the pulp. Instead of aiming to remove every seed, I try to remove the bulk of the seeds. After most of the pulp has been removed, continue to swish the seeds around in the colander to remove any remaining pulp.

Transfer seeds to a dish towel and pat them dry. When they are mostly dry, transfer them to a large plate, spread them out, and let them dry for a day until they are completely dry. They will be sticky to the touch, which is ok The important part is to get them really dry before coating and roasting them, otherwise they won’t be crisp.

Rinsing the pumpkin seeds and removing the pulp under running water in a colander.

Step 2. Once the seeds are completely dry and ready to be flavored and roasted, transfer them to the parchment-lined baking sheet. In a small bowl, add 1 1/2 tablespoons extra light olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1 pinch ground cloves, 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar, and 1 pinch of ground Himalayan pink salt. Mix together.

It’s worth mentioning here, that you can purchase measuring spoons for measurements like a tad, dash, pinch, and smidgen. I have included a photo showing a side-by-side comparison of them, to show how their volume compares to that of a 1/8 teaspoon. A tad of something is similar to a 1/8 teaspoon, whereas a smidgen is a very small amount. A pinch of something is slightly more than a smidgen. You’ll notice that the recipe calls for a pinch of ground cloves and Himalayan pink salt, which is a very small amount.

Side-by-side comparison of the 1/8, tad, dash, pinch, and smidgen measuring spoons. Spoons sit on a white marble background.
Mixing spices and sugar into extra light olive oil.

Step 3. Drizzle cinnamon sugar mixture over pumpkin seeds and stir until all seeds are coated. Make sure the seeds are spread out on the baking sheet and that there isn’t too much overlap.

Mixing the pumpkin seeds to coat them with the cinnamon sugar mixture.

Step 4. Bake for 20-30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes taking care not to brown or burn the seeds. At the 20 minute mark, I start checking every 5 minutes for doneness. Seeds are done when they are dry, crisp, and a light golden brown.

A close up of the cinnamon sugar roasted pumpkin seeds sitting on a wooden mixing spoon.

Tips for Success

  • When letting the seeds dry prior to roasting, it’s important to not let them dry on a dishtowel and to transfer them to a plate. Because the seeds are sticky, they will stick to the fibers of the dishtowel. When you go to transfer them to the baking sheet, they will have tiny fiber hairs all over (ask me how I know this lol).
  • When separating the seeds from the pulp, it’s much easier to do it in a colander that has larger holes than in a sieve. I used a sieve the first time around, and the smaller pulp strands have no way of getting washed out and away from the seeds. The larger holes allow for proper drainage.
  • The amounts of the different ingredients in this recipe have been developed for a 3/4 cup of pumpkin seeds. If you have more or less, you will need to scale the recipe. The recipe card below will do this calculation for you, if you have an integer multiple of what the recipe calls for (e.g., 2 times, 3 times, etc).
  • Prior to putting the seeds in the oven, make sure they are spread out on the baking sheet and aren’t overlapping too much.
  • It’s important to mix the seeds every 10 minutes as specified, otherwise, you risk burning them.
  • Seeds other than pumpkin or delicata (the two I have directly tested) might require slightly different roasting times. But they should fall within the 20-30 minute range. I start to pay close attention around the 20-minute mark, and then check in 5-minute increments after that to check for doneness.
Cinnamon sugar roasted pumpkin seeds on a parchment paper lined baking sheet.

Cinnamon Sugar Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

This recipe is a great way to make use of seeds from various winter squash! I like to eat them on their own, but you can also add them to granola bars, to trail mixes, or top salads and soups with them!
5 from 4 votes
Print Rate
Course: Basics
Cuisine: American
Keyword: easy, fall, gluten-free, roasted winter squash seeds, vegan
Prep Time: 5 mins
Cook Time: 25 mins
Pre-roasting drying time: 1 d
Total Time: 1 d 30 mins
Servings: 3 people
Calories: 255kcal

Ingredients 

  • 3/4 cup pumpkin seeds, washed and completely dried (OR seeds of any winter squash)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons extra light olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 pinch ground cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1 pinch freshly ground Himalayan pink salt

Instructions

  • Arrange oven rack to be in the middle. Preheat oven to 325F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • Place the seeds and pulp in a colander with large holes. Under running water, separate the seeds from the pulp and remove as much of the pulp from the seeds as possible.
  • Transfer seeds to a dish towel and pat them dry. When they are mostly dry, transfer them to a large plate, spread them out, and let them dry for a day until they are completely dry.
  • Once the seeds are completely dry and ready to be flavored and roasted, transfer seeds to parchment lined baking sheet.
  • In a small bowl, mix together extra light olive oil, ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg, ground cloves, granulated sugar, and Himalayan pink salt.
  • Drizzle olive oil mixture over the seeds and stir to coat. Make sure the seeds are spread out on the baking sheet and that there isn't too much overlap.
  • Bake for 20-30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes taking care not to brown or burn. At the 20 minute mark, I start checking every 5 minutes for doneness. Seeds are done when they are dry, crisp, and a light golden brown.
Nutrition Facts
Cinnamon Sugar Roasted Pumpkin Seeds
Amount Per Serving (1 tablespoon)
Calories 255 Calories from Fat 23
% Daily Value*
Fat 2.5g4%
Saturated Fat 0.4g3%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.1g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 8.9mg0%
Potassium 37.5mg1%
Carbohydrates 2.4g1%
Fiber 0.8g3%
Sugar 0.2g0%
Protein 0.8g2%
Vitamin A 1.9IU0%
Vitamin C 0mg0%
Calcium 3.4mg0%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Nutritional information on The Panicked Foodie is provided as a courtesy and is approximate only. We cannot guarantee the accuracy of the nutritional information given for any recipe on this site.
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