African Peanut Stew

African Peanut Stew

Jump to Recipe
Print Recipe

I came across this recipe while I was browsing the internet one day, and the list of ingredients really caught my eye. A sauce consisting of peanut butter?! YUP. Count me in!! Those of you that know me personally, know that peanut butter is basically an entire food group for me. Really, I do eat too much of it. I love baking with it, eating it plain, and now also cooking with it. This African Peanut Stew is phenomenal. With the wide range of spices, there is a lot of flavor depth to this dish. The ginger, cinnamon, and cloves compliment the sweet potato, and also balance out the mild heat from the poblano. With the addition of beans, this dish is packed with protein, which means it is very filling. This stew is definitely a new favorite of mine, and I will be making it a lot this upcoming fall and winter season!

How to Make African Peanut Stew

1. Peel and cube the sweet potatoes, finely chop the onion and the poblano pepper, and mince the garlic. Poblano peppers are very low on the Scoville Scale, which means they aren’t very hot. If you want to add some heat to this dish, you could substitute with a jalapeno pepper. At this stage, I also like to measure out all my spices and mix them together in a small dish so that they are ready to go!

Cubed sweet potato, roughly chopped collard greens, finely chopped white onion and poblano pepper, minced garlic, and a small glass dish holds the spices. Everything sits on a light wooden cutting board.

2. Heat extra light olive oil in a large pot over medium heat until it begins to shimmer. Add onion, pepper, and sweet potato. Saute for 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent. Add garlic and spices. Cook for an additional 2 minutes.

Sauteed onion, poblano pepper, sweet potato, garlic and spices in a large stainless steel frying pan.

3. Add tomato paste and peanut butter. Mix until thoroughly combined.

Addition of tomato paste and peanut butter to the sauteed onion, poblano pepper, sweet potato, garlic and spices in a large stainless steel frying pan.

4. Add broth and water. Stir together. Bring everything to a boil, then reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes.

Addition of water and vegetable broth to the vegetable mixture in a large stainless steel pot.

5. Add collard greens and beans. Stir together. Cook for an additional 15 minutes, uncovered. By cooking it uncovered, this will thicken it from a soup to a stew. Additional ways to thicken it, are to boil it uncovered for an additional 5 minutes, or use a hand masher to mash up some of the sweet potato. Serve over jasmine rice with a splash of lime juice, topped with chopped peanuts.

Addition of cannellini beans and collard greens to the stew in a large stainless steel frying pan.

African peanut stew in a small decorative white bowl. In the background is an onion, sweet potato, collard greens, poblano pepper, and a stainless steel frying pan containing the stew. The bowl of stew is topped with a vertical line of jasmine rice on the left side, and a vertical line of chopped collard greens and peanuts next to it.
5 from 8 votes
Print

African Peanut Stew

This African peanut stew is great for cool, fall nights! Serve over jasmine rice, with a splash of lime juice, and topped with chopped peanuts.

Course Dinner
Cuisine African
Keyword african peanut stew
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 6 people
Calories 289 kcal
Author The Panicked Foodie

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon extra light olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 pound sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed (~2 cups)
  • 1 poblano pepper, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 teaspoons cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 pinch ground cloves
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup water
  • 1-2 cups collard greens, roughly chopped
  • 1 15 oz. can cannelllini beans, drained and rinsed
  • cooked jasmine rice, chopped peanuts, and lime juice for serving

Instructions

  1. Heat extra light olive oil in a large pot over medium heat until it begins to shimmer.

  2. Add onion, pepper, and sweet potato. Saute for 5 minutes, or until the onion is translucent.

  3. Add garlic and spices. Cook for an additional 2 minutes.

  4. Add tomato paste and peanut butter. Mix until thoroughly combined.

  5. Add broth and water. Stir together. Bring everything to a boil, then reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes.

  6. Add collard greens and beans. Stir together. Cook for an additional 15 minutes, uncovered.

Recipe Notes

Credit: The Panicked Foodie

An image of the instagram icon, and to the right, the words "Did you make this recipe?"

Tag @thepanickedfoodie on Instagram and hashtag it #thepanickedfoodie



13 thoughts on “African Peanut Stew”

  • This dish sounds absolutely amazing! Of course, I’m probably biased, as I am also a lover of peanut butter 🙂 I am definitely going to give this one a try. Can’t wait to taste the mingling of the seasonings with the peanut butter!

  • Ok. I’m West African and this is our traditional dish. First, we call it soup not stew; our stews are tomato based. The peanut soup (or groundnut soup) base is similar across the West African region with slight variations. Your version is very good and I love the spices (anything with garlic and ginger I love) you used however it’s not the traditional way as we don’t use garlic in soups and most of those other spices. We also use W/African palm oil which is sustainable as the oil palm grows wild and is a source of income for communities so they maintain its harvest well. No worries. It’s hard to find authentic ingredients but if you have an African store in your area, try visiting to see and smell the different spices we have, depending on country/region, of course. I really like that you’re exploring other cuisines and our foods can be carb heavy but can be adapted for healthy eating such as eliminating palm oil and starch. Hope you enjoyed it. If you want to make more soups, google Egusi (melon soup). Well done!

    • Thank you Kemi for all of your information! 🙂 To be honest, I had no knowledge of the original dish, because I’ve never actually had authentic African food unfortunately. It’s weird, because the college that I went to was in a town that had a huge range of cuisines (not NYC huge, but still very impressive). I must say though, that this dish was REALLY good! I am a very exploratory person when it comes to foods, and I’m excited to try more African dishes. It sounds like they are a good match for me, because they are carbohydrate heavy, and I love carbs 🙂 Hopefully I can get to Africa some day (I am afraid of flying!) so that I can try out the cuisine there for real!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


Pin22
Share55
Tweet1
Yum
Reddit